Ceiling Sound Proofing

The article on Ceiling Sound Proofing on our web site www.soundservice.co.uk has now been updated to include more comprehensive information for anyone looking for help and advice on how to sound proof a ceiling.  The article goes on to describe most of the solutions available to obtain the best sound proofing results depending on the amount of ceiling height available that can be utilised.   If there is a lot of height available the best sound proofing results can be obtained and the article describes what can be done.  Whereas, if there is limited space, solutions are also described for those which will give a benefit in noise reduction although not as efficient as a deeper solution.

There are also more images that help describe the information being given such as what the top side of a lather and plaster ceiling looks like or a Gyproc type MF suspended ceiling.

To view the article yourself simply go straight to it via the following link http://www.soundservice.co.uk/ceiling_sound_proofing_Help.htm or call our sales department s on 01993 704981

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Sound Proofing a Floor

Sound proofing a floor can always be a daunting prospect with not knowing what to do to get the best results.  It is well known that installing mineral wool between the joists is a must.  But it is a common misconception that this is all that is required when in fact, just doing this on its own rarely gives an audible reduction in any noise levels being experienced.  The fact is that mineral wool between the joists is an important part of any upgrade of the sound proofing of any floor but it is not necessary top totally fill the joists but it is important to use the correct density which is between 40 and 60kg per cubic metre and otherwise referred to as Acoustic Mineral Wool.  It is also important to fit the wool as a loose fit and not jammed tightly into the joists.  This is because the mineral wool is a sound absorber and not a sound barrier so it does not matter if there are voids that have not been filled.

I mentioned earlier that Acoustic Mineral Wool should be used as part of an overall upgrade in the sound proofing of any timber joisted floor and for this, sound-proofing products must be added on top of the floor to get best results.

We have just updated an article on our web site about sound proofing floors and it gives all the information required to improve the sound proofing of both timber joisted and concrete floors so to read it simply copy and paste the following link into the address bar of your browser and it will take you there.

http://www.soundservice.co.uk/soundproofing_help_for_separating_floors.html  Alternatively, if you prefer to talk to one of our experts just call them on our local call rate number 0843 363 7131 or for mobiles call us on 01993 704981.  More information concerning all of our sound proofing products can be found on our web site www.soundservice.co.uk

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Sound Proofing a Wall

A new and revised article on help with how to sound proof a wall has been added to our commercial web site that gives more informed information.  The article includes details of what type of noise is usually encountered through walls and how to address it.  There are also new images showing the installation of a soundproofed stud wall to help readers understand how this works along with an image showing the overall thickness of our popular M20AD system.  Top read the article yourself simply go to it via this link http://www.soundservice.co.uk/wall_sound_proofing_Help.htm If the link does not work then copy and paste it into the address bar of your browser and that should take you there.

If you have a noise problem from neighbours through a wall and would prefer to talk to someone about what can be done then call us on 01993 704981 and one of our trained staff will be pleased to help you.

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Noise Control in Walls, Floors & Stairs

Question

I found your website whilst researching soundproofing and I was attracted by the cost savings you have advertised. I presently live in an upper flat  in a bloc of 4 or upper villa as it is rather grandly termed. This is a 1930’s affordable housing development and the sound insulation between ourselves and the neighbours is appalling, we can often hear complete conversations as well as tv noise. When I first moved in I laid a secondary hardwood floor on top of the existing floor with underlay between thinking this would help the sound insulation as well as provide us with a natural wooden floor. This was a big mistake as I now realise that I should have filled the cavity and used acoustic plasterboard. We have since installed carpets with cloud 9 underlay which has helped but still does not cut out even the talking. There could also be significant sound travel through the walls but presently we have an elderly woman living next door and apart from the tv noise she is extremely quiet (could become an issue).


This summer we are planning to extend into our loft and moving our living/kitchen/dining room upstairs. We would like to ensure that the loft space is acoustically insulated and are interested in what products and specification you would recommend for this. Further to the loft space we are installing a new staircase which is housed above our neighbours bedroom. We will have to lift the existing floorboards in this area and are looking for a solution to minimise impact noise for our downstairs neighbour and also through the wall to our bedrooms and next door neighbour.  We have bought a small quantity of thermafleece with the intention of filling the cavity between the joist in the hall area (like the eco/thermal credentials as well). Ideally we would leave the hall as natural wooden floor but in reality we would probably have to have a stair carpet or runner unless there is a viable solution. Can you please advise on building spec and also quantities of product for our loft space, stairway and also hall way.


Over the years the sound pollution has become an increasing problem and we would like to sort out the sound issue once and for all in these areas. Depending on costs and also on effectiveness we would even consider soundproofing the entire flat.

Answer

Thank you for your enquiry and before I start to advise on how to upgrade the soundproofing of your loft floor and stairs I have to say that Cloud 9 type underlay is not effective at reducing airborne noise, only impact noise so any benefit you have achieved with the use of this product I am sure would have been most welcome. 

The best way to improve the airborne sound insulation of a floor or wall is to add sound absorption and extra high density mass along with decoupling one or both sides.  With separating floors this normally entails decoupling the ceiling with our Resilient Bars and screwing 30mm (2 x 15mm) of high density Acoustic Plasterboard to the bars.  Likewise with the floors, these are usually decoupled by installing a floating floor system and with 100mm of AMW100 acoustic mineral wool as a loose fit between the joists you will have obtained a high degree of sound insulation.

With walls the same principle applies and for best results, an independent stud wall should be built 25mm away from the existing wall, infilled again with AMW type acoustic mineral wool then clad with 30mm of Acoustic Plasterboard.  A thinner version that only takes up 50mm of space is our 20mm M20AD high density recycled rubber mats glued to the wall again with 300mm of Acoustic Plasterboard glued on top.  The M20AD is both a sound absorber as well as a product with high mass so is a very good alternative to the stud wall solution although not as efficient.

Stairs always have to be carpeted and if it is only impact noise that has to be reduced to give best results I suggest the carpet this time is installed on top of the Cloud 9 underlay you already have.  Otherwise you could use our more efficient 10mm A10 acoustic underlay available in 15 sq mtr. rolls or our even more efficient 15mm thick QuietFloor Plus that will also help reduce airborne noise in addition.  With stairs and again for best soundproofing results, the underside should be boxed in with 30mm of Acoustic Plasterboard and AMW in the void.  Battens will have to be installed to the edges of the underside of the stairs that the plasterboard can be fixed to and to contain the AMW.  You mentioned sheep’s wool and this is a good alternative to using AMW because it does not cause the same degree of irritation to the skin with the added advantage of more efficient thermal insulation.

More information including prices on all of these products can be found on our web site www.soundservice.co.uk   Installation instructions along with technical data can also be found on the rhs of each product page site or call us on 01993704981

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QuietPanel Sound Insulation for Party Walls

QuietPanel is a 27.5mm thick screw applied solution to upgrade the sound insulation properties of any wall.  For best results QuietPanel can be used on single party walls of masonry construction or lighter weight stud walls.  Thicker solutions of acoustic insulation will nearly always give better results when trying to reduce noise through any wall but often a thicker solution is not possible for various reasons. 

That is why we introduced this ultra thin acoustic system which is designed for those that are unable to fit thicker, more efficient noise control systems due to the close proximity of doors or windows.

This thinner system for upgrading the sound insulation of walls is very popular and is also a favourite of construction companies when refurbishing houses or flats.  Because QuietPanel is so thin, it is a favoured option to upgrade the sound insulation of walls dividing rooms such as bedrooms in the home.  Modern properties are often built using lightweight stud walls to separate rooms and of course, these walls are not as acoustically efficient as the more traditional masonry walls.  It is well known that stud walls perform badly for noise insulation but now they can be upgraded using the QuietPanel system that is easy to screw on and takes up very little space.  So now you can obtain more privacy without losing too much space and using a system that will not break the bank.

For more information on QuietPanel including technical specifications and installation instructions, go to our web page via this link http://www.soundservice.co.uk/quietpanel-recycled-wall-soundproofing.html

or call us on 01993704981

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Airborne Noise Control

Question

I found your website whilst researching soundproofing and I was attracted by the cost savings you have advertised. I presently live in an upper flat  in a bloc of 4 or upper villa as it is rather grandly termed. This is a 1930’s affordable housing development and the sound insulation between ourselves and the neighbours is appalling, we can often hear complete conversations as well as tv noise. When I first moved in I laid a secondary hardwood floor on top of the existing floor with underlay between thinking this would help the sound insulation as well as provide us with a natural wooden floor. This was a big mistake as I now realise that I should have filled the cavity and used acoustic plasterboard. We have since installed carpets with cloud 9 underlay which has helped but still does not cut out even the talking. There could also be significant sound travel through the walls but presently we have an elderly woman living next door and apart from the tv noise she is extremely quiet (could become an issue).


This summer we are planning to extend into our loft and moving our living/kitchen/dining room upstairs. We would like to ensure that the loft space is acoustically insulated and are interested in what products and specification you would recommend for this. Further to the loft space we are installing a new staircase which is housed above our neighbours bedroom. We will have to lift the existing floorboards in this area and are looking for a solution to minimise impact noise for our downstairs neighbour and also through the wall to our bedrooms and next door neighbour.  We have bought a small quantity of thermafleece with the intention of filling the cavity between the joist in the hall area (like the eco/thermal credentials as well). Ideally we would leave the hall as natural wooden floor but in reality we would probably have to have a stair carpet or runner unless there is a viable solution. Can you please advise on building spec and also quantities of product for our loft space, stairway and also hall way.


Over the years the sound pollution has become an increasing problem and we would like to sort out the sound issue once and for all in these areas. Depending on costs and also on effectiveness we would even consider soundproofing the entire flat.

Answer

Thank you for your enquiry and before I start to advise on how to upgrade the soundproofing of your loft floor and stairs I have to say that Cloud 9 type underlay is not effective at reducing airborne noise, only impact noise so any benefit you have achieved with the use of this product I am sure would have been most welcome. 

The best way to improve the airborne sound insulation of a floor or wall is to add sound absorption and extra high density mass along with decoupling one or both sides.  With separating floors this normally entails decoupling the ceiling with our Resilient Bars and screwing 30mm (2 x 15mm) of high density Acoustic Plasterboard to the bars.  Likewise with the floors, these are usually decoupled by installing a floating floor system and with 100mm of AMW100 acoustic mineral wool as a loose fit between the joists you will have obtained a high degree of sound insulation.

With walls the same principle applies and for best results, an independent stud wall should be built 25mm away from the existing wall, infilled again with AMW type acoustic mineral wool then clad with 30mm of Acoustic Plasterboard.  A thinner version that only takes up 50mm of space is our 20mm M20AD high density recycled rubber mats glued to the wall again with 300mm of Acoustic Plasterboard glued on top.  The M20AD is both a sound absorber as well as a product with high mass so is a very good alternative to the stud wall solution although not as efficient.

Stairs always have to be carpeted and if it is only impact noise that has to be reduced to give best results I suggest the carpet this time is installed on top of the Cloud 9 underlay you already have.  Otherwise you could use our more efficient 10mm A10 acoustic underlay available in 15 sq mtr. rolls or our even more efficient 15mm thick QuietFloor Plus that will also help reduce airborne noise in addition.  With stairs and again for best soundproofing results, the underside should be boxed in with 30mm of Acoustic Plasterboard and AMW in the void.  Battens will have to be installed to the edges of the underside of the stairs that the plasterboard can be fixed to and to contain the AMW.  You mentioned sheep’s wool and this is a good alternative to using AMW because it does not cause the same degree of irritation to the skin with the added advantage of more efficient thermal insulation.

More information including prices on all of these products can be found on our web site www.soundservice.co.uk   Installation instructions along with technical data can also be found on the rhs of each product page site or call us on 01993704981

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DIY Soundproof Fences

Are you troubled with road noise coming into your back garden or live close to a railway and cannot afford purpose made soundproofed fencing? Then why not build your own? First of all you will have to check with the local authority to ensure that you will not be infringing any planning laws and if necessary, apply for planning permission before constructing a soundproofed fence. Will it work? I hear you ask. Of course, but do not expect to soundproof out all of the noise you are being subjected to. A soundproofed fence should be constructed as high as possible for best results and this is usually at least 8ft (2.4m). Lower fences will still reduce noise nuisance from the other side, just not as efficiently. Let me explain how noise works. Noise flows a bit like air and water. It does not travel in straight lines which is why you can often hear traffic from some distance away despite obstacles that may be between you and the noise. This is because noise travels over and around obstacles a bit like rocks in a river and the only sure way of stopping it is to construct a total sound barrier a bit like a dam that it cannot get round or through. Although this is possible within buildings, clearly it is not possible outside so soundproof fencing is the best solution to reduce noise from nearby and the best reduction in noise will be experienced closest to the fence. This why it is worthwhile installing an acoustic barrier around your garden to reduce noise from nearby traffic. Although noise will still come over the top of the fence, direct noise will be significantly reduced and independent tests have shown that noise reductions of around 17dB can be achieved with an acoustic fence 10ft (3m) high and measured 16ft (5m) away. This will drop to around 12dB from 65ft (20m) and shows how you are being subjected to more noise flowing over the top of the fence the farther you are away from it, even though noise loses intensity over distance.

We all know that a purpose built acoustic fence will cost an arm and a leg but now we can tell you how to do this yourself for a fraction of the price but if you are not DIY motivated, your local builder should be able to undertake the work for you following these instructions. First of all you have to install the fence posts and these are usually 4” x 4” (100mm x 100mm) and have to be set into concrete footings about 2ft (600mm) into the ground. Remember, the heavy soundproof fence will be subjected to a lot of stress from wind and weather so will have to be securely fixed into the ground If the fence is going to be higher than 8ft (2.4m) then deeper holes will be required. Once the concrete has set you can fit the cross members to the posts. These are usually 2” x 4” (50mm x 100mm) timbers that are screwed to the posts and give extra support for the fence cladding. The number of cross rails will depend on how high the acoustic fence is going to be but as a general rule of thumb, they should be at 2ft (600mm) spacings above and beneath one another.

Once the fence frame is completed, before you start you will require the following sound insulating materials. SoundBlocker Membrane, a heavy mineral loaded soundproofing mat that the professionals use to soundproof ceilings and walls. This sound barrier material is supplied in rolls (10m x 1m) and Acoustic Sealant available in 380ml cartridges.

Both of these products are available from www.keepitquiet.co.uk or www.soundproofing-direct.co.uk if you wish to purchase on line.

The rolls of membrane are quite heavy and unsupported so it is advised you have help when fixing it to the rails and it is best to choose a day with no wind.  For a better result the membrane should be nailed using broad headed felt nails to both sides of the fencing ensuring the membrane is fully supported using the help you have enlisted.  If too much weight is placed on not enough nails, the product will simply break away.  The SoundBlocker Membrane is fixed to the rails ensuring the bottom edge is in contact with the ground and all joints are overlapped by at least 2” (50mm) and sealed with our Acoustic Sealant. It is important that all gaps and joints are sealed with the sealant otherwise sound will leak through making the soundproofing of the fence less efficient. Once the SoundBlocker Membrane has been fitted and sealed it is time to overlay with the fencing cladding of your choice and would normally be shiplap type fencing or a close boarded panelling. If you have just added the soundproofing material to one side of the fencing then that is the side the timber cladding should be fixed to. Whereas if both sides of the fence has had the membrane attached then the timber cladding will be required on both sides as well. Note! It is always better to clad both sides not just acoustically but to give added protection to the soundproofing membrane from deliberate or accidental damage and is common practice. When fitting the cladding, ensure the boards are in direct contact with each other and if necessary, seal them with the Acoustic Sealant.

Job done! Now sit back and enjoy the quieter garden you have now created.

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